USRobotics
       

Contents:

Introduction

Installing Your Modem

Transmitting Data and Faxes

Using JetSetter Software

Troubleshooting and Support>

AT Commands,
S-Registers, and
Result Codes

Regulatory Information

USRobotics 56K PC Card Modem User Guide

Troubleshooting

Support Resources

 

Troubleshooting

Having trouble with your modem? Try these basic troubleshooting steps first!

Verify that the phone cord is installed correctly.

The phone cord should be plugged into the XJACK® connector or PC card connector on the modem and into the telephone wall jack. Use the phone cord included in your modem’s box, if possible.

Verify that the modem was installed correctly.

Make sure that your modem is physically installed correctly in your computer. You must press the modem in firmly so that it is seated properly in the PC card slot.

Next, make sure that the modem's drivers have been installed correctly. Follow the instructions for your operating system:

Windows XP (Classic View): Click Windows Start, Control Panel, and then double-click the Phone and Modem Options icon.

Windows XP (Category View): Click Windows Start, Control Panel, Network and Internet Connections, and then Phone and Modem Options.

Windows 2000: Click Windows Start, Control Panel, and then Phone and Modem Options.

Click the Modems tab. You should see a description of your new U.S. Robotics modem and a COM port setting. If you do not see a description of your modem, see the Note at the end of this section.

Make sure that your new USRobotics modem is selected and click Properties. Click the Diagnostics tab. Click Query Modem. You should see a series of commands and responses from the modem. This means that the installation was successful.

If you do not see commands and responses, shut down and restart your computer. To determine whether your modem is functioning properly, repeat the steps above. If your modem is still not working, refer to the additional troubleshooting steps in this guide.


Windows Me, 98, and 95: Click Windows Start, Settings, and then Control Panel. Double-click the Modems icon.

In the Modems Properties screen, you should see a description for your new USRobotics modem. If you do not see a description of your modem, see the Note at the end of this section.

Click the Diagnostics tab. Make sure that the correct COM port (modem) is selected. Click the More Info button. You should see a series of commands and responses from the modem. This means that the installation was successful.

If you do not see commands and responses, shut down and restart your computer. To determine whether your modem is functioning properly, repeat the steps above. If your modem is still not working, refer to the additional troubleshooting steps in this guide.


Windows NT 4.0: Click Windows Start, Settings, and then Control Panel. Double-click the Modems icon. In the Modems Properties screen, you should see a description for your new USRobotics modem.

If you do not see commands and responses, shut down and restart your computer. To determine whether your modem is functioning properly, repeat the steps above. If your modem is still not working, refer to the additional troubleshooting steps in this guide.


Note: If your modem is not listed and/or you do not see a series of commands and responses, make sure that your phone cord is attached correctly to your modem. If your modem still does not work, refer to the additional troubleshooting steps of this guide. Shut down and restart your computer. To verify that your modem is functioning properly, repeat the steps listed for your operating system.

 

For more troubleshooting help, review these common issues:

My computer isnít recognizing my modem.

Possible Solution:
You may be using an IRQ that is already in use. To function properly, your modem needs to be assigned to a free IRQ.

The Plug and Play function of Windows should locate a free IRQ (if one exists) for your modem. If Plug and Play fails to install the modem, you need to determine IRQ availability.

Windows XP and 2000: Right-click the My Computer icon on your desktop. Click Properties. Click the Hardware tab and then click Device Manager. Click View. Select Resources by type or Resources by connection. Expand the Interrupt request (IRQ) key by clicking + or double-clicking the Interrupt request (IRQ) key.

Windows Me, 98, and 95: Right-click the My Computer icon on your desktop. Click Properties and then the Device Manager tab. Double-click the Computer icon at the top of the device list.

You will see a listing of your systemís IRQs and the devices to which they are assigned. If an IRQ is not present in this list, it indicates that Windows is not currently using it and the IRQ is considered available.

Locate your modem in the list of devices. If a yellow exclamation point appears over the modemís description, your modem is in conflict with another device. Either your modem or the other device will have to be reinstalled to another IRQ in order to resolve your conflict.

If a usable, free IRQ does not exist, you may need to remove, disable, or relocate another device. Refer to that deviceís documentation for more information about removing, disabling, or relocating it.

If Windows still fails to recognize your modem and it does not have a yellow exclamation point next to its IRQ, or if your modem does not appear in the list, your modem may not be installed properly. Try reinstalling the modem.


Windows NT 4.0: Restart your computer and check for an available IRQ by clicking Windows Start, Programs, Administrative Tools, and Windows NT Diagnostics. Click the Resources tab and select IRQ. You will see a listing of your systemís IRQs and the devices to which they are assigned. If an IRQ is not present in this list, it indicates that Windows is not currently using it and the IRQ is considered available. Typically, modems can use IRQ 3, 5, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, or 15. Take note of an available IRQ that your modem can use. Your modem should be assigned to one of these IRQs.

If there are no IRQs available, you may need to remove, disable, or relocate another device in order to free an IRQ for use by your modem. Refer to that device’s documentation for more information about removing, disabling, or relocating it.

Possible Solution:
You may be using a COM port that is either already in use or not configured correctly. To work properly, this modem must be assigned to a free COM port. Make sure that your COM port is not already in use by another device.

Windows XP (Classic View): Click Windows Start and then Control Panel. Double-click the Phone and Modem Options icon and then click the Modems tab. Look for another modem already installed in your computer. The COM port that it is using is listed to the right of the modem description.

Windows XP (Category View): Click Windows Start, Control Panel, Network and Internet Connections, and then Phone and Modem Options. Click the Modems tab. Look for another modem already installed in your computer. The COM port that it is using is listed to the right of the modem description.

Windows 2000: Click Windows Start, Settings, and then Control Panel. Double-click the Phone and Modem Options icon and then click the Modems tab. Look for another modem already installed in your computer. The COM port that it is using is listed to the right of the modem description.

Windows Me, 98, and 95: Click Windows Start, Settings, Control Panel, and then double-click Modems. Look for another modem already installed in your computer. If there is another modem installed, click the Diagnostics tab to find out which COM port it is using.

Windows NT 4.0: Click Windows Start, Settings, Control Panel, and then double-click Modems. Look for another modem already installed in your computer. The COM port that it is using is listed to the right of the modem description.


If a previously installed modem is already using the available COM port, you should uninstall that modem. See your previous modem’s manual for uninstallation instructions.


Next, make sure that your COM ports are configured correctly.

Windows XP and 2000: Right-click the My Computer icon on your desktop. Click Properties. Click the Hardware tab and then click Device Manager. Expand the Ports (COM & LPT) key by clicking + or double-clicking the Ports (COM & LPT) key.

Windows Me, 98, and 95: Right-click the My Computer icon on your desktop. Click Properties. Click the Device Manager tab. Expand the Ports (COM & LPT) key by clicking + or double-clicking the Ports (COM & LPT) key.

If the COM ports have yellow exclamation points or red Xs over them, your COM ports may be configured incorrectly. If this is the case, you may need to contact your computer manufacturer.

My software isnít recognizing my modem.

Possible Solution:
You may not have the correct modem selected in your software or in Windows. To check which modem you are using, follow the instructions for your operating system:

Windows XP (Classic View): Click Windows Start and then Control Panel. Double-click the Phone and Modem Options icon and then click the Modems tab. You will see a list of installed modems.

Windows XP (Category View): Click Windows Start, Control Panel, Network and Internet Connections, and Phone and Modem Options. Click the Modems tab. You will see a list of installed modems.

Windows 2000: Click Windows Start, Settings, and then Control Panel. Double-click the Phone and Modem Options icon and then click the Modems tab. You will see a list of installed modems.

Windows NT 4.0, Me, 98, and 95: Click Windows Start, Settings, and Control Panel. Double-click the Modems icon. You will see a list of installed modems.

You can also add, remove, or view the properties of modems from this window. The USRobotics modem you have installed should be present in the list of installed modems. If none of the modem descriptions in the list matches your USRobotics modem or if no modems are listed, your modem is not installed properly. Try reinstalling your modem.

Possible Solution:
If you are using Dial-up Networking, it may not be configured correctly. Check your configuration and make sure that the correct port is selected.

Windows XP and 2000: Click Windows Start, Control Panel (or Settings in Windows 2000), and Network and Dial-up Connections. Make sure that the description in the “Connect Using” box (under the General tab) matches the description of the modem you are using. If it does not match, select the proper modem description.

Windows Me, 98, and 95: Double-click the My Computer icon on your desktop, and then double-click Dial-up Networking. Right-click the connection your are trying to use, and then click Properties. Make sure that the description in the modem box matches the description of the modem you are using. If it does not match, select the proper modem description.

Windows NT 4.0: Click Windows Start, Settings, and Control Panel. Double-click the Dial-up Monitor. Your modem should be in the Device window.

Possible Solution:
Your communications software may not function properly if you have more than one version of the software installed, you are using an older version, or you have more than one communications application installed on your system. We recommend using the communications software provided with your modem on the Installation CD-ROM.

My modem is responding but is reporting a No Dial Tone message.

Possible Solution:
Your phone cord may not be plugged into the modem. Also make sure the other end of the phone cord is plugged into a working telephone wall jack.

Possible Solution:
You may have devices between the modem and telephone wall jack that affect the quality of your phone line. Do not connect other devices between the telephone wall jack and your modem.

Possible Solution:
You may have plugged your modemís phone cord into a digital line, which can damage your modem. If you are unsure whether your line is analog or digital, ask your network administrator, building management, or your local telephone company.

Possible Solution:
If your phone system requires dialing a digit such as “9” in order to access an outside line, be sure to add the digit and a comma (9,) before the number you want to dial.

Possible Solution:
If you have voice mail provided by your phone company, your dial tone may be altered when messages are waiting. Retrieve your voice mail to restore a normal dial tone.

Note: If you are unable to retrieve the messages, you may want to add five commas to the beginning of the number to be dialed. Each comma represents two seconds. Therefore, adding five commas will delay the modem connection attempt by 10 seconds. Since each ISP connection may vary, you should insert as many commas as necessary to meet your specific needs. Commas may be necessary if voice mail messages have not been deleted before attempting to establish an Internet connection.

Possible Solution:
You may have a bad phone cord. Try a different phone cord. We recommend using the phone cord included with the modem, if possible.

Possible Solution:
You may have a non-standard dial tone. Do the following to check for a non-standard dial tone:

  1. Open a terminal program, such as HyperTerminal, in Windows. To open the Terminal window, select Cancel at the new connection dialog box.


  2. Type ATE1 and press ENTER. You may not see the letters, which is fine.


  3. Type ATX3DT and the phone number of a local ISP (Internet Service Provider) or BBS number. Press ENTER.


  4. If the modem dials out and connects, either have your phone line checked or try adding X3 to the Extra Settings field in your modem’s Properties window.


  5. If the modem doesn't attempt to connect and it comes back with a No Carrier message, the issue may not be phone line related.

  6. To end your HyperTerminal session, click File and select Exit. Select Yes when the Are you sure you want to disconnect? message appears. Select No when the Do you want to save this session? message appears.

My modem wonít dial out or doesnít answer incoming calls.

Possible Solution:
Your phone cord may not be plugged into the modem. Also make sure the other end of the phone cord is plugged into a working telephone wall jack.

Possible Solution:
You may have a bad phone cord. Try a different phone cord. We recommend using the phone cord included with the modem, if possible.

Possible Solution:
You may have devices between the modem and telephone wall jack that affect the quality of your phone line. Do not connect other devices between the telephone wall jack and your modem.

Office users

Possible Solution:
You may have plugged your modemís phone cord into a digital line, which can damage your modem. If you are unsure whether your line is analog or digital, ask your network administrator, building management, or your local telephone company.

Possible Solution:
If your phone system requires dialing a digit such as “9” in order to access an outside line, be sure to add the digit and a comma (9,) before the number you want to dial.

Voice mail users

Possible Solution:
If you have voice mail provided by your phone company, your dial tone may be altered when messages are waiting. Retrieve your voice mail to restore a normal dial tone.

Note: If you are unable to retrieve the messages, you may want to add five commas to the beginning of the number to be dialed. Each comma represents two seconds. Therefore, adding five commas will delay the modem connection attempt by 10 seconds. Since each ISP connection may vary, you should insert as many commas as necessary to meet your specific needs. Commas may be necessary if voice mail messages have not been deleted before attempting to establish an Internet connection.

My modem sounds like itís trying to connect to another modem but fails.

Possible Solution:
You may have a poor connection. All calls are routed differently, so try placing the call again.

My modem isnít achieving a 56K Internet connection.

Possible Solution:
Our research has shown that the vast majority of telephone lines can and do support V.90 connections. The V.90 protocol allows for connection speeds of up to 56K, but line conditions may affect the actual speeds during a given connection. Due to unusual telephone line configurations, some users will not be able to take full advantage of V.90 technology at this time. To achieve a V.90 connection, the following conditions must be met:

  • The server you are dialing into must support and provide a digital V.90 signal. Your ISP can provide you with a list of dial-up connections and information on what those connections currently support.


  • The telephone line between your ISP and your modem must be capable of supporting a 56K connection and contain only one analog-to-digital conversion. The 56K signal from your ISP begins as a digital signal. Somewhere between the ISP and your modem, there will be a digital-to-analog signal conversion so that your modem can receive the data. There must be no more than one analog-to-digital signal conversion in the path from your ISP to your modem. If more than one such conversion occurs, your connection speeds will default to V.34+ or below. There may also be impairments on the local lines between your ISP and your modem. These impairments can prevent or limit connection speeds. All telephone calls are routed differently, so you should try making your 56K connection several times. One way to test this is to dial into a long distance location. Long distance lines are often much clearer than local lines. It is important to note that telephone companies are constantly upgrading their systems. Lines that do not support 56K today may support 56K in the near future.


  • For a V.90 connection, your modem must be connecting to a V.90/56K server. A pair of 56K modems will not connect to each other at V.90/56K speeds.

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Support Resourses

Are you still having problems?

If you have not fixed your problem after trying the suggestions in the Troubleshooting steps of this guide, you can receive additional help via one of these convenient resources:

  1. Support section of the USRobotics Web site at www.usr.com

    Many of the most common difficulties users experience have been addressed in the FAQ and Troubleshooting Web pages for your specific product. You may need to know your product ID (USR0756-CB or USR0756-XJ) to obtain information on the USRobotics Web site.


  2. USRobotics Technical Support Department

    Technical questions about USRobotics modems can also be answered by technical support specialists.

  3. In the United States and Canada:
    Telephone: (801) 401-1144
    Online: www.usr.com/emailsupport
    Hours: 9:00 A.M.Ė 5:00 P.M. CST, Monday Ė Friday


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